HIMSS 2018

Another HIMSS conference is in the books. Amidst the craziness that HIMSS can be, it is always a pleasure to spend time running into friends, collaborators, and former colleagues.  There have been lots of great pieces written about 2018 HIMSS, including by Chrissy Farr and by Lisa Suennen. Here are some of my thoughts and takeaways:

1 – Where’s the Peds?

HIMSS pretty much has a little something for anybody. However, walking the exhibition hall and seeing vendor booths, attending sessions, and talking with colleagues, there was a noticeable under-representation of anything having to do with pediatric care. I’m guessing this has something to do with $$, but I would love to see more attention paid to the specific needs of children, parent caregivers, pediatric care, and children’s hospitals.

2 – Cash and Flash

HIMSS had its usual plethora of vendor swag giveaways, plush carpeted booths, sponsored parties and happy hours, steak dinners, and other signs of the amount of money flowing through the system. One couldn’t help but wonder, if the biggest challenge facing American healthcare is one of cost and value, how could we be spending this much money on HIMSS while telling each other we were there to save money?

Some great tweets on this subject:

Screenshot 2018-03-12 10.20.56Screenshot 2018-03-12 10.20.33

 

3 – Interoperability’s Day Has Arrived

With many thanks to years and years of tireless work by Ken Mandl, Josh Mandel, Aneesh Chopra, Micky Tripathi, Graham Grieve, and so many others, there was a palpable sense that FHIR APIs are crossing from “early adopter” to “mainstream.” CMS announced “Blue Button 2.0,” an API containing four years of Medicare claims data for 53 million beneficiaries that allows individuals to allow third parties to receive that data via API. The VA announced its Lighthouse platform, which gives external developers access to data and tools from the VA in order to more easily build apps to serve the needs of veterans. This is happening.

4 – 2018 HIMSS Word Cloud

AI. Cloud. Interoperability. Security. Provider Burden. API. Connected. Engaged. Consumer. Coordinated…… and Blockchain

4b – My favorite 2018 HIMSS pitch

Started off with the company saying, “even though all our founders come from an AI-background, and all our competitors use AI, we do not use AI in our product.”

5 – From EHR Implementations to Pilots to Mainstream Digital Health

Lots of thought and effort is going into thinking about how to scale innovation and move digital health into the mainstream. How can we create the infrastructure, processes, and tools to try things out, iterate, and scale innovations to get beyond the pilot trap? You can still feel the tension as people try to move past the era of EHR implementations to actually using their EHRs as an underlying platform to achieve care delivery goals like patient engagement, population health, and precision medicine. How can we best use EHRs as a platform on top of which we can integrate novel apps, analytics, and decision support?  To me, solving this at scale is the key question and challenge of the next several years.

 

 

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A Lesson In Clinical Decision Support: We Cannot Defeat Human Nature

      Our UCSF Clinical Informatics group met a few months ago with several representatives from a major Health IT vendor. The vendor, we’ll call them RxLabs, is a provider of pharmaceutical related knowledge in many domains, including decision support tools for the EHR. Our conversation centered around how to better customize medication alerts. We talked about the popular topic of “alert fatigue,” and how to improve EHR decision support tools to improve their impact, rather than just being white noise annoying clinicians.
      The vendor was walking us through a slide-deck about their hypotheses and data about EHR medication alerts and we were having a vibrant discussion about how to improve provider adherence with decision support. We saw slide after slide about how to make pop-ups smarter and about trying to get more buy-in from providers with paying attention to alerts. After all, why would a provider trying to take care of her patient ignore an alert that is trying to help provide an important message? It must be sloppiness or laziness on the part of providers!
      Ten minutes in to this conversation about drug alerts, up pops the following:
Windows 7 Display Alert
      I’ll give you a second to guess what happened next.
      Without a moment’s hesitation or thought, the presenter clicked the little X in the upper right corner. Our conversation went on. More slides. More data about medication alerts in the EHR. Ten minutes later, guess what happened?
      Up came the same pop-up Windows alert. The presenter again, hastily, without paying attention, and perhaps giving a small huff of displeasure, clicked the little X in the upper right corner. More slides, ten more minutes, same thing. You get the idea.
      This happened three times, with each passing pop-up, the presenter becoming slightly more annoyed. The fourth time the pop-up appeared, my colleague Russ Cucina, the Associate CMIO at UCSF, paused the presenter to have us all read the pop-up alert message. We took ten seconds together to learn that selecting any of the three choices rather than clicking the “x” would have satisfied the alert and kept it from coming back.
      The room broke out into laughter. We all understood our own hypocrisy. We cannot defeat human nature.
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